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CIAM/NASA Mach 6.5 Scramjet Flight and Ground Test
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Author and Affiliation:
Voland, R. T.(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States);
Auslender, A. H.(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States);
Smart, M. K.(Lockheed Martin Engineering and Sciences Co., Hampton, VA, United States);
Roudakov, A. S.(Central Inst. of Aviation Motors, Aerospace Propulsion Dept., Moscow, Russia);
Semenov, V. L.(Central Inst. of Aviation Motors, Aerospace Propulsion Dept., Moscow, Russia);
Kopchenov, V.(Central Inst. of Aviation Motors, Aerospace Propulsion Dept., Moscow, Russia)
Abstract: The Russian Central Institute of Aviation Motors (CIAM) performed a flight test of a CIAM-designed, hydrogen-cooled/fueled dual-mode scramjet engine over a Mach number range of approximately 3.5 to 6.4 on February 12, 1998, at the Sary Shagan test range in Kazakhstan. This rocket-boosted, captive-carry test of the axisymmetric engine reached the highest Mach number of any scramjet engine flight test to date. The flight test and the accompanying ground test program, conducted in a CIAM test facility near Moscow, were performed under a NASA contract administered by the Dryden Flight Research Center with technical assistance from the Langley Research Center. Analysis of the flight and ground data by both CIAM and NASA resulted in the following preliminary conclusions. An unexpected control sensor reading caused non-optimal fueling of the engine, and flowpath modifications added to the engine inlet during manufacture caused markedly reduced inlet performance. Both of these factors appear to have contributed to the dual-mode scramjet engine operating primarily in a subsonic combustion mode. At the maximum Mach number test point, combustion caused transition from supersonic flow at the fuel injector station to primarily subsonic flow in the combustor. Ground test data were obtained at similar conditions to the flight test, allowing for a meaningful comparison between the ground and flight data. The results of this comparison indicate that the differences in engine performance are small.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 1999
Document ID:
20040087160
(Acquired Sep 03, 2004)
Subject Category: AIRCRAFT DESIGN, TESTING AND PERFORMANCE
Report/Patent Number: AIAA Paper 99-4848
Document Type: Conference Paper
Financial Sponsor: NASA Langley Research Center; Hampton, VA, United States
Organization Source: NASA Langley Research Center; Hampton, VA, United States
Description: 9p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution under U.S. Government purpose rights
NASA Terms: GROUND TESTS; NASA PROGRAMS; MACH NUMBER; SUPERSONIC COMBUSTION RAMJET ENGINES; AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING; HYPERSONIC SPEED; RUSSIAN FEDERATION; KAZAKHSTAN; FLIGHT TESTS; COMBUSTION CHAMBERS; ENGINE INLETS; CONTROL SYSTEMS DESIGN; AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE; HYBRID PROPULSION; PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION; HYDROGEN ENGINES; FUEL INJECTION
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