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Development of Carbon Dioxide Removal Systems for Advanced Exploration Systems
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Author and Affiliation:
Knox, James C.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Trinh, Diep(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Gostowski, Rudy(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
King, Eric(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Mattox, Emily M.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Watson, David(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Thomas, John(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States)
Abstract: "NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is pioneering new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit" (NASA 2012). These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, evaluating structured sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach, which is then implemented in a full-scale integrated atmosphere revitalization test. This paper describes the carbon dioxide (CO2) removal hardware design and sorbent screening and characterization effort in support of the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program. A companion paper discusses development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations for this project.
Publication Date: Jul 15, 2012
Document ID:
20120015336
(Acquired Nov 01, 2012)
Subject Category: MAN/SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SUPPORT
Report/Patent Number: M12-1773
Document Type: Conference Paper
Meeting Information: 42nd International Conference on Environmental Systems; 15-19 Jul. 2012; San Diego, CA; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Washington, DC, United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Organization Source: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Description: 11p; In English; Original contains color and black and white illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: CARBON DIOXIDE REMOVAL; SORBENTS; AIR PURIFICATION; LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS; SPACECRAFT ENVIRONMENTS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; CARBON DIOXIDE; SORPTION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; SPACECREWS; ZEOLITES; SILICA GEL; THERMOGRAVIMETRY; PELLETS
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